3,540 kilometres of racing across 21 of the toughest days in the cycling calendar. Check out every stage of the 2017 Tour de France.

Stage 1: Saturday, July 1 - Düsseldorf to Düsseldorf - 14km (individual time trial)

The 104th edition of the Tour de France starts on the banks of the Rhine in Dusseldorf. A flat 13 kilometre test against the clock, gaps are likely to be small yet potentially decisive on the general classification in a race with fewer time trial kilometres than in previous years.
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Stage 2: Sunday, July 2 - Düsseldorf to Liège - 203.5km (flat)

A sprint is expected on day two with the race leaving Germany for the famous cycling city Liege, just over the border in Belgium. A late fourth category climb could cause fireworks, but the sprinters should back themselves to contest the win.
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Stage 3: Monday, July 3 - Verviers to Longwy - 212.5km (rolling)

The Tour will pass through three countries on day three: Belgium, Luxembourg and France. The finish in Longwy is atop the third category Cote des Religieuses and, whoever prevails in the uphill sprint, will hope to take the yellow jersey.
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Stage 4: Tuesday, July 4 - Mondorf-les-Bains to Vittel - 207.5km (flat)

For the final time in 2017 the stage starts outside of France, in Mondorf-les-Bains, Luxembourg, before winding its way south to Vittel for what looks like another early chance for the sprinters.
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Stage 5: Wednesday, July 5 - Vittel to La Planche des Belles Filles - 160.5km (high mountain)

The scene of Chris Froome’s first Tour de France stage win, La Planche des Belles Filles is a gruelling climb, and the first serious mountain test of the 2017 edition. It’s only the third time the mountain has been included in the Tour, but the 5.9km climb has already developed a fearsome reputation. Expect fireworks at the end of the short and sharp 160.5km stage.
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Stage 6: Thursday, July 6 - Vesoul to Troyes - 216km (flat)

Before heading south the race heads inland and sets up another chance for the sprinters into Troyes.
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Stage 7: Friday, July 7 - Troyes to Nuits-Saint-Georges - 213.5km (flat)

The sprinters will be hoping to double up on stage seven, with another reasonably flat day. A late fourth category ascent - the Cote d’Urcy - could provide some motivation for an inspired breakaway into Nuits-Saint-Georges.
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Stage 8: Saturday, July 8 - Dole to Station des Rousses - 187.5km (medium mountain)

A breakaway looks likely on day eight with three late climbs that increase in severity. The final category one Montee de la Combe de Laisia Les Molunes tops out 11km from the finish, setting up a mad dash to the line.
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Stage 9: Sunday, July 9 - Nantua to Chambery - 181.5km (high mountain)

With 4,600m of climbing on the menu, stage nine looks set to be a beast. The riders will climb from the gun in Nantua and tackle seven categorised climbs in all, culminating in the hors categorie Mont du Chat. With a flat finish it might not be too selective, but there’s sure to be some movement on the general classification ahead of the first rest day.
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Stage 10: Tuesday, July 11 - Périgueux to Bergerac - 178km (flat)

After the race packs up to fly from the east of France to the west, enjoying the first rest day in Dordogne, the sprinters are likely to come to the fore on stage 10, with the fast men battling it out in Bergerac.
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Stage 11: Wednesday, July 12 - Eymet to Pau - 203.5km (flat)

Another back-to-back chance for the sprinters, with the finish in Pau looking likely to welcome a bunch kick. 
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Stage 12: Thursday, July 13 - Pau to Peyragudes - 214.5km (high mountain)

A leg sapping 215km stage will greet the riders when they hit the Pyrenees, with six categorised climbs to contend with. The final kilometre of the stage should be spectacular, raced on a runway at the only airport in the Pyrenees. A 200 metre section with a gradient of 16% will just add to the drama.
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Stage 13: Friday, July 14 - Saint-Girons to Foix - 101km (high mountain)

Brace yourselves for a breathtaking stage. Just 100km long but containing three first category climbs, the action will go from the gun until the last metre in Foix. A strong team is likely to be essential, otherwise stage 13 could well prove to be unlucky for some GC contenders.
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Stage 14: Saturday, July 15 - Blagnac to Rodez - 181.5km (rolling)

After the excitement of the day before, stage 14 should prove to be a little more sedate. It is likely to be too tough for the sprinters though, with three category three climbs squeezed into the second half of the stage, ahead of the uphill finish into Rodez.
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Stage 15: Sunday, July 16 - Laissac-Sévérac l’Église to Le Puy-en-Velay - 189.5km (medium mountain)

Just 17km into stage 15 the peloton will face a tough first category climb up to over 1,000 metres of altitude in what should be an intriguing stage. Two further late climbs could well entice a large breakaway group ahead of a fast finish.
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Stage 16: Tuesday, July 18 - Le Puy-en-Velay to Romans-sur-Isère - 165km (rolling)

Stage 16 should ease the peloton back into action after the race’s second rest day. Two early climbs are unlikely to cause too big a problem for the sprinters, who will be licking their lips over the flat finish in Romans-sur-Isere.
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Stage 17: Wednesday, July 19 - La Mure to Serre Chevalier - 183km (high mountain)

Three huge climbs in the Alps could see big movement on the leaderboard after stage 17. The Col de la Croix de Fer, the Col du Telegraph and the Col du Galibier all lie in wait, with a tasty 20km descent to finish. Buckle up.
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Stage 18: Thursday, July 20 - Briançon to Izoard - 179.5km (high mountain)

The race’s third and final summit finish atop the Col d’Izoard is one to look forward to. It’s the last chance for the race’s true climbers to shine or for the race leader to consolidate their lead. It should be special.
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Stage 19: Friday, July 21 - Embrun to Salon-de-Provence - 222.5km (rolling)

At 222.5km, stage 19 is the 2017 Tour’s longest stage. Coming so late in the race a breakaway win looks more likely than a bunch sprint, but the fast men will be keen to make the most of their limited opportunities. 
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Stage 20: Saturday, July 22 - Marseille to Marseille - 22.5km (individual time trial)

Not only will the race’s contenders have to deal with the pressure of battling for the win on stage 20, but they’ll have to do it under the watchful eye of 70,000 French fans. The race’s final time trial starts and finishes inside Marseille’s Velodrome stadium, which will add a raucous edge to proceedings. The course itself is 22.5km - just long enough to create some potentially decisive time splits.
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Stage 21: Sunday, July 23 - Montgeron to Paris Champs-Élysées - 103km (flat)

From Marseille to Paris. After flying to the French capital, the last stage will unfold as it always does - a procession into the French capital, a blast around the Champs Elysees, and then a battle between the sprinters. 
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